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April- 2019

   

Researchers reveal how bacteria can adapt to resist treatment by antibiotics

           New research shows that bacteria produce a specific stress molecule, divide more slowly, and thus save energy when they are exposed to antibiotics. The new knowledge is expected to form the basis for development of a new type of antibiotics.

Source: sciencedaily

 

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How Enterococcus faecalis bacteria causes antibiotic resistant infection

           A new study describes how bacteria adapted to the modern hospital environment and repeatedly cause antibiotic-resistant bloodstream infections. This study examined one of the first sustained hospital outbreaks of a multidrug-resistant bacterium, Enterococcus faecalis, which occurred from the early through the mid-1980s, causing over 60 outbreak strains.

Source: sciencedaily

 

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All microbes and fungi on the International Space Station catalogued

           A comprehensive catalogue of the bacteria and fungi found on surfaces inside the International Space Station (ISS) is being presented in a study published in the open access journal Microbiome. Knowledge of the composition of the microbial and fungal communities on the ISS can be used to develop safety measures for NASA for long-term space travel or living in space.

Source: sciencedaily

 

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Deep microbes' key contribution to Earth's carbon cycle

           Hydrocarbons play key roles in atmospheric and biogeochemistry, the energy economy, and climate change. Most hydrocarbons form in anaerobic environments through high temperature or microbial decomposition of organic matter. Subsurface microorganisms can also 'eat' hydrocarbons, preventing them from reaching the atmosphere. Using a new technique, scientists show that biological hydrocarbon degradation gives a unique biological signature. These findings could help detect subsurface biology and understand the carbon cycle and its impact on climate.

Source: sciencedaily

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March- 2019

   

Same microbe, different effect

           Microbes are the most common and diverse organisms on the planet. A new search engine, called BIGSI, allows scientists to search public microbial DNA data for specific genes and mutations. This could help researchers monitor the spread of antibiotic resistance genes, and understand how bacteria and viruses evolve and adapt.

Source: sciencedaily

 

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Excessive phosphate fertilizer use can reduce microbial functions critical to crop health

           Scientists set out to determine if nutrient history changed the function of soil microorganisms. The answer seems to be yes, and that soil treated with high amounts of phosphate can result in poorer plant performance, but even more intriguing, it appears that the soil microorganisms from this conditioned soil can negatively impact plant yield.

Source: sciencedaily

 

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Most microbes in hummingbird feeders do not pose health hazard

           A new study is one of the first to address the potential for sugar water from hummingbird feeders to act as a vector for avian or even zoonotic pathogens. It found that the majority of microbes growing in feeders do not likely pose a significant health hazard to birds or humans.

Source: sciencedaily

 

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Plant seed research provides basis for sustainable alternatives to chemical fertilizers

           Scientists assessed the seed microbiomes of two successive plant generations for the first time and discovered that seeds are an important vector for transmission of beneficial endophytes across generations.

Source: sciencedaily

 

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February- 2019

   

Dermal disruption: Amphibian skin bacteria is more diverse in cold, variable environments

           Researchers swabbed more than 2300 animals representing 205 amphibian species to better understand the ecology of their skin bacteria. They asked which environmental factors influence the makeup of their microbiomes and how might the makeup of their microbiomes be important to amphibian health and survival?.

Source: sciencedaily

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Effect of breastfeeding versus pumping on human milk microbiome

           A large-scale analysis in humans suggests that the milk microbiota is affected by bacteria both from the infant's mouth and from environmental sources such as breast pumps, although future research will be needed to assess the effects that these changes may have on the infant gut microbiome and infant health.

Source: sciencedaily

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New disease surveillance tool helps detect any human-infecting virus

           A new computational method called 'CATCH' designs molecular 'baits' for any virus known to infect humans and all their known strains, including those that are present in low abundance in clinical samples, such as Zika. The approach can help small sequencing centers around the globe conduct disease surveillance, which is crucial for controlling outbreaks.

Source: sciencedaily

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The web meets genomics: A DNA search engine for microbes

           Microbes are the most common and diverse organisms on the planet. A new search engine, called BIGSI, allows scientists to search public microbial DNA data for specific genes and mutations. This could help researchers monitor the spread of antibiotic resistance genes, and understand how bacteria and viruses evolve and adapt.

Source: sciencedaily

 

— Read more

 

January- 2019

   

European waters drive ocean overturning, key for regulating climate

           An international study reveals the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, which helps regulate Earth's climate, is highly variable and primarily driven by the conversion of warm, salty, shallow waters into colder, fresher, deep waters moving south through the Irminger and Iceland basins. This upends prevailing ideas and may help scientists better predict Arctic ice melt and future changes in the ocean's ability to mitigate climate change by storing excess atmospheric carbon.

Source: sciencedaily

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Huge step forward in decoding genomes of small species

            For the first time, scientists have read the whole genetic code of one single mosquito. Scientists worked to advance technology and lower the starting amount of DNA needed to just 'half a mosquito-worth', producing the first high quality whole genome of a single mosquito. The study in genes opens the door to understanding the true genetic diversity of insects and other arthropods.

Source: sciencedaily

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Shellfish could revolutionize human health research

            Shellfish like oysters and mussels have the potential to revolutionize human health research, according to a new article. The study reveals how using bivalves as model organisms offers numerous promising avenues for medical research from pharmaceutical development to bone regeneration.

Source: sciencedaily

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Scientists explore tick salivary glands as tool to study virus transmission, infection

            The salivary glands of some tick species could become important research tools for studying how viruses are transmitted from ticks to mammals, and for developing preventive medical countermeasures. Tick salivary glands usually block transmission, but a new study focuses on the role of salivary glands in spreading flaviviruses from black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) to mammals.

Source: sciencedaily

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